The New York Times helped “cancel” one teenager for a sickening reason

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Cancel culture is only getting worse.

People who do or say anything that offends the “woke” cultural mandarins must be read out of polite society.

And The New York Times helped “cancel” one teenager for a sickening reason.

Mimi Groves, an 18-year-old college freshman, got a disturbing lesson about cancel culture run amok.

When Groves was a 15-year-old high school freshman, she recorded a three-second Snapchat video after receiving her driving learner’s permit.

In the clip, she regrettably said, “I can drive, [N-word],” mimicking rap lyrics she’d listened to.

The clip eventually made its way to James Galligan, a high school classmate whom she did not know.

Galligan saved the clip with the intention of releasing it when it would do the most damage to Groves’ life.

Groves had accomplished her dream of making the squad of the defending national champion cheerleading team at the University of Tennessee.

Groves shared a post on Instagram in support of Black Lives Matter, and that’s when Galligan chose to “cancel” her.

Administrators at Tennessee encouraged her to withdraw from the university after a supposed deluge of backlash.

Even worse, The New York Times wrote a piece affirming what Galligan did called 

“A Racial Slur, a Viral Video, and a Reckoning.”

The “reckoning” was essentially that ruination of Groves’s dream.

Groves apologized and said she was oblivious about the history of the racial epithet because it’s featured in “all the songs we listened to, and I’m not using that as an excuse.”

Groves’s cancellation even perturbed left-wing journalists like Michael Tracey:

Galligan, who’s father is white and mother is black, is the poster child for progressive wokeism.

He declared that his father had “white privilege” and explained his actions by saying, “’If I never posted that video, nothing would have ever happened . . . I’m going to remind myself, you started something . . . You taught someone a lesson.”

Judging by the backlash against Galligan, perhaps he’s going to learn a lesson himself about the public ire toward cancel culture.